Roadtrip Days 2-4

On Day 2, I headed off to Charlottesville to meet up with Mark Rock, aka Peter Markush. I stopped in the exurbs between Baltimore and DC for the first of what will probably be many Chick-fil-a sandwiches consumed on this trip. I also took the first picture with my new camera. As you can see, I was not able to refrain from consuming the sandwich before taking a picture of it.

I found my way to Random Row Books, where I was set to perform with Mark Rock and a very good guitar/cello duo called Barling and Collins. It was cold and rainy out,  so the event was sparsely attended. Barling, Collins, and we all sat in with Mark Rock, and during my set, Mark Rock accompanied me on piano as I read “The Boy Who Cried Wolves” (which, incidentally, was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize).

That afternoon, I got bad news about Poly, so I decided to drive to Richmond early in the morning and catch a flight back to NYC. By the evening of Day 3, however, we got good news from Poly’s biopsy. The tumor doesn’t appear to be malignant, so the immediate threat is not as serious as we feared. She will probably be okay.

Day 4, I shared some bacon and eggs with Poly, did some dayjob work, ran some errands, and watched TV. That night I attended Jonathan Letham’s reading in at Book Court in Brooklyn. It was pretty good, but not as good as the Big Buford sandwich I had at Checkers on the way there. After the reading, I packed my things to prepare for an early flight back to Virginia to pick up where I left off.

New Work: The Boy Who Cried Wolves

The new issue of Fogged Clarity just came out, and it features a short story of mine called “The Boy Who Cried Wolves.”

This issue also features an interview with author Benjamin Percy, fiction by Harvey Havel, and a bunch of other multimedia coolness. This is one of the nicest looking literary/arts magaizines on the web, IMO, so please check it out.

Also, check out the highly pretentious “Statement of Intent” that I submitted to them along with the story (one of their requirements for submission).

One of the things I’ve been interested in exploring with my fiction is the way that a new story can be affected by a an old one that is already deeply imbedded in our consciousness. In this case, only the title is a play on words from a traditional fable, and the rest of the idea flowed from the slight change in the wording. But because of that small wordplay, the reader’s experience is colored through the association with the traditional story even though the two actual stories are actually quite different.

I Am a Literary Upstart

[repost from There Will Be Blog]

As a semifinalist in the L Magazine’s “Literary Upstart” contest, I was asked to read last night at the Slipper Room. There was a sizeable and enthusiastic audience and three other semifinalists reading. At the end, the four of us were critiqued by a panel of judges, American Idol style, and one reader moved on to the finals. That one reader was not me.

I wish I could tell you the names of the other readers or of the judges, but I don’t have that information easily accessible at the moment. Maybe I’ll update later to include that. In any case, the judges’ comments were mostly superficial, and they clearly had not understood one of the major points about my story–so I really couldn’t take the whole thing very seriously. So here for your enjoyment, is my performance from last night, which one of the judges said reminded him of a”city council meeting.”

I Am a Literary Upstart

As a semifinalist in the L Magazine’s “Literary Upstart” contest, I was asked to read last night at the Slipper Room. There was a sizeable and enthusiastic audience and three other semifinalists reading. At the end, the four of us were critiqued by a panel of judges, American Idol style, and one reader moved on to the finals. That one reader was not me.

I wish I could tell you the names of the other readers or of the judges, but I don’t have that information easily accessible at the moment. Maybe I’ll update later to include that. In any case, the judges’ comments were mostly superficial, and they clearly had not understood one of the major points about my story–so I really couldn’t take the whole thing very seriously.

So here for your enjoyment, is my performance from last night, which one of the judges said reminded him of a “city council meeting.”

New Work: “The Year of Myself” in Kora Journal

Poet Zachary C. Bush started an online literary magazine earlier this year, Kora Journal. The focus is primarily on quality experimental poetry, prose poetry, and flash fiction.

The second issue, which went online today, features my newest story, “The Year of Myself.” This issue also has new work from JA Tyler, Eric Beeny, Louis E. Bourgeois, and Howie Good–all of whom are excellent writers.

Also, in case you missed it in an earlier post, you can see a video of me reading an early draft of “The Year of Myself” here.

So What About That Cantarabooks Situation

See here, here, here, and here for background.

It’s been over a month since my last post on this topic, and several people have asked me if there are any updates. The short answer is: no.

Cantara did send a message out to her mailing list yesterday with links to my blog posts and her own summary of the situation so far, but the upshot is that she STILL doesn’t have control of her bank accounts and STILL doesn’t even know what John Gill is suing her about. That all seems odd because I would think that the lawsuit should be available as a public record, but I can only take her at her word on that.

Cantara does have a lawyer working on the case, but no concrete results to speak of yet.

UPDATE: This just in from Cantara:

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Dear Comrade-in-Letters –

A small step, but a step nonetheless.

Our lawyer advised Mr. Gill’s attorney of the fact that Michael and I have been living in California since 2007 and she’s requested a copy of our lease to back this up – not a problem. (To show why we didn’t receive the Summons and Complaint at our old residence in Woodside last year.)

She was also informed that a copy of the Summons and Complaint was TAPED to the door of our mailing address at 204 E 11th Street in the East Village. Those of you who live in NYC might picture that and understand why we never received it, either.

Her letters to WAMU on our behalf have been redirected to another WAMU address. Copies of her letters going to Gill’s attorney are also being sent to this WAMU address… So it looks like we’re starting a case file there as well. Hope it doesn’t get too thick.

Once the entire batch of affidavits, document copies, etc, is complete, it’ll be sent to Gill’s lawyer, the court, and WAMU.

And AFTER THAT – we’ll probably still have to answer the original complaint. Will keep you posted.

– Cantara